vCJD Donor Notification Exercise: 2005

P. E. Hewitt, C. Moore, Katherine Soldan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

UK blood services, supported by the Health Protection Agency/Health Protection Scotland, carried out an exercise over the summer of 2005 to notify 110 donors whose blood was transfused to three recipients who later developed vCJD. These donors were to be informed that they were now considered ‘at risk of vCJD for public health purposes’. The notification began on 20 July 2005 and was completed (barring follow-up) at the end of the first week of October 2005. Apart from two donors who had died, contact was attempted with all donors, including four who were not currently registered with a GP. The lessons learnt about the conduct of such notification have been reviewed. The limited ad hoc feedback available suggests the process and content of this notification was acceptable to donors and their GPs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-178
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Ethics
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Hewitt PE 1 Moore C 1 Soldan K 2 1 National Blood Service, Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5BG, UK patricia.hewitt@nbs.uk 2 CJD Section Health Protection Agency, Centre for Infections, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, UK 01 09 2006 1 3 172 178 © 2006 Royal Society of Medicine Press 2006 UK blood services, supported by the Health Protection Agency/Health Protection Scotland, carried out an exercise over the summer of 2005 to notify 110 donors whose blood was transfused to three recipients who later developed vCJD. These donors were to be informed that they were now considered 'at risk of vCJD for public health purposes'. The notification began on 20 July 2005 and was completed (barring follow-up) at the end of the first week of October 2005. Apart from two donors who had died, contact was attempted with all donors, including four who were not currently registered with a GP. The lessons learnt about the conduct of such notification have been reviewed. The limited ad hoc feedback available suggests the process and content of this notification was acceptable to donors and their GPs.

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