Using public health scenarios to predict the utility of a national syndromic surveillance programme during the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games

Roger Morbey*, Alex Elliot, Andre Charlett, S. Ibbotson, Neville Verlander, Stephen Leach, Ian Hall, I. Barrass, M. Catchpole, B. Mccloskey, B. Said, A. Walsh, Richard Pebody, Gillian Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    SUMMARY During 2012 real-time syndromic surveillance formed a key part of the daily public health surveillance for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. It was vital that these systems were evaluated prior to the Games; in particular what types and scales of incidents could and could not be detected. Different public health scenarios were created covering a range of potential incidents that the Health Protection Agency would require syndromic surveillance to rapidly detect and monitor. For the scenarios considered it is now possible to determine what is likely to be detectable and how incidents are likely to present using the different syndromic systems. Small localized incidents involving food poisoning are most likely to be detected the next day via emergency department surveillance, while a new strain of influenza is more likely to be detected via GP or telephone helpline surveillance, several weeks after the first seed case is introduced.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)984-993
    Number of pages10
    JournalEpidemiology and Infection
    Volume142
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2014

    Keywords

    • Bioterrorism
    • Cryptosporidium
    • influenza
    • public health
    • surveillance system

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