UK Renal Registry 19th Annual Report: Chapter 10 Epidemiology of Reported Infections in Patients Receiving Dialysis in England between January 2015 and December 2015: A Joint Report from Public Health England and the UK Renal Registry

Lisa Crowley, Stephanie MacNeill, Shona Methven, Olisaeloka Nsonwu, John Davies, Fergus J. Caskey, Richard Fluck, Catherine Byrne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between January 2015 and December 2015 there were a total of 31 episodes of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia in patients receiving dialysis for end stage renal disease. The rate of MRSA episodes per 100 dialysis patient years was 0.13 compared to 0.15 the previous year. Rates of Methicillin Sensitive Staphyloccoccus aureus (MSSA) continued their gradual increase with a rate of 2.35 per 100 patient years compared with 2.26 the year before. This was a result of 560 episodes of bloodstream infection between January and December. Rates of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were stable with 245 recorded episodes giving a rate of 1.03 per 100 patient years. Escherichia coli (E.coli) infections occurred at a rate of 1.7 per 100 dialysis patient years, an increase on the previous year's rate of 1.49. As found in previous years, a tunnelled catheter was associated with a higher number of infection episodes than other forms of access in those patients with a staphylococcal bacteraemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalNephron
Volume137
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • cStaphylococcus
  • Dialysis
  • Epidemiology
  • Escherichia coli
  • Established renal failure
  • Infection
  • MRSA
  • MSSA

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