The self-reported oral health status and dental attendance of smokers and non-smokers in England

Julia Csikar, Jing Kang, Ceri Wyborn, Tom A. Dyer, Zoe Marshman, Jennifer Godson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking has been identified as the second greatest risk factor for global death and disability and has impacts on the oral cavity from aesthetic changes to fatal diseases such as oral cancer. The paper presents a secondary analysis of the National Adult Dental Health Survey (2009). The analysis used descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses and logistic regression models to report the self-reported oral health status and dental attendance of smokers and non-smokers in England. Of the 9,657 participants, 21% reported they were currently smoking. When compared with smokers; non-smokers were more likely to report 'good oral health' (75% versus 57% respectively, p<0.05). Smokers were twice as likely to attend the dentist symptomatically (OR = 2.27, CI = 2.02-2.55) compared with non-smoker regardless the deprivation status. Smokers were more likely to attend symptomatically in the most deprived quintiles (OR = 1.99, CI = 1.57-2.52) and perceive they had poorer oral health (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.42-2.20). The present research is consistent with earlier sub-national research and should be considered when planning early diagnosis and management strategies for smoking-related conditions, considering the potential impact dental teams might have on smoking rates.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0148700
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Csikar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The self-reported oral health status and dental attendance of smokers and non-smokers in England'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this