The association of hepatitis A and Helicobacter pylori with sensitization to common allergens, asthma and hay fever in a population of young British adults

D. Jarvis*, C. Luczynska, S. Chinn, P. Burney

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A negative association of oro-faecally spread infection with serological markers of sensitization and allergic disease has been reported. Method: Previous infection with hepatitis A and Helicobacter pylori was assessed in a community-based sample of young British adults and associations with serum-specific IgE to environmental allergens, asthma-like symptoms and hay fever were examined. Results: There was no association of previous infection with hepatitis A or H. pylori with wheeze or hay fever. There was no evidence of an association of infection with either agent and sensitization except for the isolated finding of a lower prevalence of sensitization to grass in those with IgG antibodies to H. pylori (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.43-0.99). This association did not explain the negative association of family size with sensitization to grass. Conclusion: In this population, there was no evidence that infection with hepatitis A or H. pylori was associated with lower levels of IgE sensitization, asthma or hay fever except for an isolated finding of a negative association of H. pylori infection with sensitization to grass.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1063-1067
Number of pages5
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atopy
  • Epidemiology
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Hepatitis A

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