Systematic review of the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of MF59® adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines for the prevention of laboratory-confirmed influenza in individuals ≥18 years of age

Eamon O Murchu*, Laura Comber, Karen Jordan, Sarah Hawkshaw, Liam Marshall, Michelle O’Neill, Máirín Ryan, Conor Teljeur, Annasara Carnahan, Jaime Jesús Pérez, Anna Hayman Robertson, Kari Johansen, Jorgen de Jonge, Tyra Krause, Nathalie Nicolay, Hanna Nohynek, Ioanna Pavlopoulou, Richard Pebody, Pasi Penttinen, Marta Soler-SoneiraOle Wichmann, Patricia Harrington

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The most effective means of preventing seasonal influenza is through vaccination. In this systematic review, we investigated the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of MF59® adjuvanted trivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccines to prevent laboratory-confirmed influenza. A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic databases and grey literature sources up to 7 February 2020. Randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies of interventions (NRSIs) were eligible for inclusion. The search returned 28,846 records, of which 48 studies on MF59® adjuvanted vaccines met our inclusion criteria. No efficacy trials were identified. In terms of vaccine effectiveness (VE), MF59® adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines were effective in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in older adults (aged ≥65 years) compared with no vaccination (VE = 45%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 23%–61%, 5 NRSIs across 3 influenza seasons). By subtype, significant effect was found for influenza A(H1N1) (VE = 61%, 95% CI 44%–73%) and B (VE = 29%, 95% CI 5%–46%), but not for A(H3N2). In terms of relative VE, there was no significant difference comparing MF59® adjuvanted trivalent vaccines with either non-adjuvanted trivalent or quadrivalent vaccines. Compared with traditional trivalent influenza vaccines, MF59® adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines were associated with a greater number of local adverse events (RR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.50–2.39) and systemic reactions (RR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.02–1.38). In conclusion, MF59® adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines were found to be more effective than ‘no vaccination’. Based on limited data, there was no significant difference comparing the effectiveness of MF59® adjuvanted vaccines with their non-adjuvanted counterparts.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2329
JournalReviews in Medical Virology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Keywords

  • Fluad
  • MF59
  • influenza vaccines

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