Structured surveillance of infectious intestinal disease in pre-school children in the community: "The Nappy Study"

Miren Iturriza-Gómara*, Alex Elliot, C. Dockery, D. M. Fleming, J. J. Gray

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence and causes of infectious intestinal disease (IID) in children aged <5 years presenting to general practitioners (GPs) were estimated. During a 12-month period, soiled nappies were collected from children presenting with symptoms suggestive of IID in a network of 65 GPs located across England. Molecular methods were used to detect a range of enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and parasites. Genotyping was performed on rotavirus and norovirus isolates. A total of 583 nappies were collected from 554 children; a pathogen was detected in 361 (62%) specimens. In the 43 practices 1584 new episodes of IID were recorded in a population averaging 19774; the specimen capture rate was 28%. IID incidence peaked during March and April. Norovirus (24·5%), rotavirus (19·0%) and sapovirus (12·7%) were most commonly detected, and mixed infections were detected in 11·7% of cases. Strain characterization revealed G1P[8] (65·8%), G4P[4] (8·1%) and G9P[8] (8·1%) as the most common rotavirus genotypes, similar to the UK national distribution. GII-3 (42·9%) and GII-4 (39·7%) were the most common norovirus genotypes; this was significantly different (P <0·005) to the national distribution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)922-931
Number of pages10
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume137
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Burden of disease
  • Children
  • Gastroenteritis
  • General practice

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