Rising rates of hospital-onset Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in NHS acute trusts in England: a review of national surveillance data, August 2020–February 2021

R. Sloot*, O. Nsonwu, D. Chudasama, G. Rooney, C. Pearson, H. Choi, E. Mason, A. Springer, S. Gerver, C. Brown, R. Hope

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Increases in hospital-onset Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia rates in England were observed between August 2020 and February 2021 to the highest levels recorded since the start of mandatory surveillance in April 2017. Cases were extracted from England's mandatory surveillance database for key Gram-negative bloodstream infections. Incidence rates for hospital-onset bacteraemia cases increased from 8.9 (N=255) to 14.9 (N=394) per 100,000 bed-days for Klebsiella spp. [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.7, P<0.001], and from 4.9 (N=139) to 6.2 (N=164) per 100,000 bed-days for P. aeruginosa (IRR 1.3, P<0.001) (August 2020–February 2021). These incidence rates were higher than the average rates observed during the same period in the previous 3 years. These trends coincided with an increase in the percentage of hospital-onset bacteraemia cases that were also positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors wish to thank their colleagues throughout Public Health England and external organizations, particularly NHS acute trusts, which are responsible for the collection and management of the data used in this analysis. This work would not be possible without their contributions.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • Bacteraemia
  • Gram-negative
  • Hospital-onset
  • Surveillance

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