Review of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever infection in kosova in 2008 and 2009: Prolonged viremias and virus detected in urine by PCR

Sherine Thomas*, Gail Thomson, Stuart Dowall, Christina Bruce, Nicola Cook, Linda Easterbrook, Laura O'Donoghue, Sian Summers, Lindita Ajazaj, Roger Hewson, Timothy Brooks, Salih Ahmeti

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a virus transmitted predominantly by ticks. However, contact with infected body fluids or tissues can result in animal-to-human or human-to-human transmission. Numbers of CCHF cases appear to be increasing, especially in Europe. We reviewed cases admitted to a tertiary referral unit in Kosova with suspected CCHF in 2008 and 2009, and looked at a smaller number of specimens which were sent to the Health Protection Agency, Porton Down, U.K., in further detail. The clinical features of cases admitted with suspected CCHF infection were assessed in more detail, and these are the focus of this article. Between 2008 and 2009, the numbers of patients admitted for suspected CCHF infection increased. Of the samples received in Porton Down, CCHF virus was detected in urine samples, and these patients were found to have prolonged viremia. The detection of CCHF in urine, as well as the prolonged viremias seen, are important for clinicians to know, as they may have public health implications with regard to the risk of infection, as well as provide insights into the biology and pathophysiology of infection. Further studies are required regarding the pathogenesis of this virus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)800-804
Number of pages5
JournalVector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
  • Diagnostics
  • Epidemiology
  • Kosova

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