Respiratory syncytial virus epidemiology in a birth cohort from Kilifi District, Kenya: Infection during the first year of life

D. James Nokes*, Emelda A. Okiro, Mwanajuma Ngama, Lisa J. White, Rachel Ochola, Paul D. Scott, Patricia A. Cane, Graham F. Medley

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    69 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We report estimates of incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during the first year of life for a birth cohort from rural, coastal Kenya. A total of 338 recruits born between 21 January 2002 and 30 May 2002 were monitored for symptoms of respiratory infection by home visits and hospital referrals. Nasal washings were screened by use of immunofluorescence. From 311 child-years of observation (cyo), 133 RSV infections were found, of which 48 were lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) and 31 were severe LRTIs, resulting in 4 hospital admissions. There were 121 primary RSV infections (248 cyo), of which 45 were LRTIs and 30 were severe LRTIs, resulting in 4 hospital admissions; there was no association with age. RSV contributed significantly to total LRTI disease in this vaccine-target group.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1828-1832
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume190
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2004

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    Received 2 February 2004; accepted 27 May 2004; electronically published 8 October 2004. Presented in part: RSV 2003 Symposium, Stone Mountain, GA, November 2003 (abstract PV-9). Financial support: Wellcome Trust (grant 061584). The manuscript is published with permission of the Director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Reprints or correspondence: D. James Nokes, KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Research Programme, PO Box 230, Kilifi, Kenya (jnokes@kilifi.mimcom.net).

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