Public perceptions of pre-incident information campaign materials for the initial response to a chemical incident: The “Remove, Remove, Remove” campaign

Holly Carter*, Dale Weston, Charles Symons, Richard Amlot

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In the event of a hazardous chemical release incident in the UK, affected members of the public would undergo improvised and interim forms of decontamination (the “Initial Operational Response” (IOR)). To enable members of the public to take recommended actions quickly, the Home Office and National Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Centre have developed the “Remove, Remove, Remove” pre-incident information campaign. This is designed to raise awareness amongst a broad range of people with a public safety role, as well as members of the general public. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Public perceptions of the utility of “Remove, Remove, Remove” pre-incident information materials were assessed using focus group discussions and questionnaires. Findings: Perceptions of the “Remove, Remove, Remove” campaign poster were generally positive, and the groups agreed that releasing this type of information prior to an incident occurring is a positive step. There was consensus that the poster contains useful information, and that members of the public would benefit from receiving this information prior to a chemical incident occurring. Originality/value: The findings from this study have been used to inform the development of the “Remove, Remove, Remove” materials. These materials have been disseminated to all emergency services in the UK to further embed IOR principles, as well as to crowd safety professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-584
Number of pages20
JournalDisaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • CBRN
  • Communication
  • Preparedness and response
  • Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Public perceptions of pre-incident information campaign materials for the initial response to a chemical incident: The “Remove, Remove, Remove” campaign'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this