Proposal for human respiratory syncytial virus nomenclature below the species level

Vahid Salimi, Mariana Viegas, Alfonsina Trento, Charles N. Agoti, Larry J. Anderson, Vasanthi Avadhanula, Justin Bahl, Louis Bont, J. Rodney Brister, Patricia A. Cane, Mónica Galiano, Barney S. Graham, Eneida L. Hatcher, Orienka Hellferscee, David M. Henke, Siddhivinayak Hirve, Sandra Jackson, Els Keyaerts, Leyla Kragten-Tabatabaie, Stephen LindstromInne Nauwelaers, D. James Nokes, Peter J. Openshaw, Teresa C. Peret, Pedro A. Piedra, Kaat Ramaekers, Annabel Rector, Nídia Sequeira Trovão, Anne von Gottberg, Maria Zambon, Wenqing Zhang, Thomas C. Williams, Ian G. Barr*, Ursula J. Buchholz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the leading viral cause of serious pediatric respiratory disease, and lifelong reinfections are common. Its 2 major subgroups, A and B, exhibit some antigenic variability, enabling HRSV to circulate annually. Globally, research has increased the number of HRSV genomic sequences available. To ensure accurate molecular epidemiology analyses, we propose a uniform nomenclature for HRSV-positive samples and isolates, and HRSV sequences, namely: HRSV/subgroup identifier/geographic identifier/unique sequence identifier/year of sampling. We also propose a template for submitting associated metadata. Universal nomenclature would help researchers retrieve and analyze sequence data to better understand the evolution of this virus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E1-E9
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume27
Issue number6
Early online date10 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Support for this work was provided by the Intramural Research Programs of the Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. M.Z. was supported by Public Health England (PHE), and I.N. was supported by PHE and by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Respiratory Health Protection Unit. The work of J.R.B. and E.L.H. was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. T.C.W. was the recipient of a Wellcome Trust Award [204802/Z/16/Z]. The WHO’s Global RSV Surveillance is supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant award no. OPP1127419.

Funding Information:
This manuscript is dedicated to the memory of Jose A. Melero, a superb scientist and leader in the HRSV field and a wonderful and generous friend to us all. Support for this work was provided by the Intramural Research Programs of the Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. M.Z. was supported by Public Health England (PHE), and I.N. was supported by PHE and by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Respiratory Health Protection Unit. The work of J.R.B. and E.L.H. was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. T.C.W. was the recipient of a Wellcome Trust Award [204802/Z/16/Z]. The WHO's Global RSV Surveillance is supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant award no. OPP1127419. S.H., S.J., and W.Z. work with the World Health Organization. The authors are responsible for the views expressed in this publication and they do not necessarily represent the decisions, policy or views of the World Health Organization. Names of specific vendors, manufacturers, or products are included for public health and informational purposes; inclusion does not imply endorsement of the vendors, manufacturers, or products by the World Health Organization. L.A. has done paid consultancies on RSV vaccines for Bavarian Nordic, Novavax, ClearPath Vaccines Company, and Pfizer; his laboratory is currently receiving funding through Emory University from Pfizer and Advac for laboratory studies for HRSV surveillance studies in adults, and he holds a subcontract on an NIH SBIR award to Sciogen on G protein HRSV vaccines. L.A. is a co-inventor on several CDC patents on the HRSV G protein and its CX3C chemokine motif relative to immune therapy and vaccine development, and on a patent filing for use of HRSV platform VLPs with the F and G proteins for vaccines. U.B. reports CRADA support to NIH from Sanofi Pasteur, outside the submitted work; in addition, she has patents on live-attenuated HRSV with royalties paid to NIH by Sanofi Pasteur. There are no additional conflicts of interest by any of the authors.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All rights reserved.

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