Polling booth surveys: A novel approach for reducing social desirability bias in HIV-related behavioural surveys in resource-poor settings

Catherine Lowndes*, A. A. Jayachandran, Pradeep Banandur, Banadakoppa M. Ramesh, Reynold Washington, B. M. Sangameshwar, Stephen Moses, James Blanchard, Michel Alary

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study compared rates of HIV-related sexual risk behaviours reported in individual face-to-face (FTFI) and group anonymous polling booth (PBS) interviews in India. In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered yes/no questions by putting tokens with question numbers in colour-coded containers. Data were subsequently collated for each group as a whole, so responses were not traceable back to individuals. Male and female PBS participants reported substantially higher rates of pre-marital, extra-marital, commercial and anal sex than FTFI participants; e.g. 11 vs. 2% married males reported paying for sex; 6 vs. 1% unmarried males reported homosexual anal sex.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1054-1062
    Number of pages9
    JournalAIDS and Behavior
    Volume16
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2012

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    Acknowledgments This research was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The polling booth survey methodology was developed in India by Catalyst Management Services and Mahila Samakhya Karnataka.

    Keywords

    • HIV
    • India
    • Interviewing techniques
    • Sexual behaviour
    • Social desirability bias
    • Survey methodologies

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