Outcome of an exercise to notify patients treated by an obstetrician/gynaecologist infected with HIV-1.

S. C. Crawshaw*, O. N. Gill, J. Heptonstall, M. G. Rowland, R. J. West, J. M. Hill, A. B. Davies, E. M. Dunbar, R. B. Buttery, C. Quigley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experience with hepatitis B suggests that the risk of HIV transmission from a health care worker infected with HIV to a patient will be greatest during major surgical procedures. The number of patients worldwide who are known to have undergone such procedures, been notified, and subsequently tested is still too small to be confident that the risk of HIV transmission in these circumstances is negligible. We describe a patient notification exercise, undertaken in the United Kingdom in 1991. Attempts were made to contact 1217 patients, in three health districts (A, B, and C), who had undergone surgical procedures performed by an obstetrician/gynaecologist who was infected with HIV. The exercise aimed to offer the patients reassurance, counselling and--if they wished--HIV testing. One thousand one hundred and forty-two patients (94%) were contacted, and all 520 who elected to be tested were negative for anti-HIV. The proportion of identified patients tested was 63% in district A, 35% in district B, and 61% in district C. Surgical procedures were classified retrospectively according to the likely risk (none, possible, or high) of exposure to the doctor's blood and, therefore, risk of HIV transmission. One hundred and ninety-five of those tested had undergone a procedure that carried a high risk of exposure; 179 had undergone a procedure thought to carry no risk. Patients in districts A and C who had undergone a procedure that carried a high risk of exposure were more likely to be tested than those who had not; 206 patients overall had undergone procedures that carried a high risk of exposure but were not subsequently tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)R125-128
JournalCommunicable disease report. CDR review
Volume4
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 1994
Externally publishedYes

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