Novel 16S rRNA methyltransferase RmtE3 in Acinetobacter baumannii ST79

Emma Taylor, Elita Jauneikaite, Shiranee Sriskandan, Neil Woodford, Katie L. Hopkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. The 16S rRNA methyltransferase (16S RMTase) gene armA is the most common mechanism conferring high-level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii, although rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD and rmtE have also been reported. Hypothesis/Gap statement. The occurrence of 16S RMTase genes in A. baumanniiin the UK and Republic of Ireland is currently unknown. Aim. To identify the occurrence of 16S RMTase genes in A. baumannii isolates from the UK and the Republic of Ireland between 2004 and 2015. Methodology. Five hundred and fifty pan-aminoglycoside-resistant A. baumannii isolates isolated from the UK and the Republic of Ireland between 2004 and 2015 were screened by PCR to detect known 16S RMTase genes, and then whole-genome sequencing was conducted to screen for novel 16S RMTase genes. Results. A total of 96.5% (531/550) of isolates were positive for 16S RMTase genes, with all but 1 harbouring armA (99.8%, 530/531). The remaining isolates harboured rmtE3, a new rmtE variant. Most (89.2%, 473/530) armA-positive isolates belonged to international clone II (ST2), and the rmtE3-positive isolate belonged to ST79. rmtE3 shared a similar genetic environment to rmtE2 but lacked an ISCR20 element found upstream of rmtE2. Conclusion. This is the first report of rmtE in A. baumannii in Europe; the potential for transmission of rmtE3 to other bacterial species requires further research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number001531
JournalJournal of Medical Microbiology
Volume71
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance at Imperial College London in partnership with Public Health England (HPRU-2012-10047).

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Professor Bruno González-Zorn, Dr Laurent Poirel and Dr Yohei Doi for providing bacterial positive controls for rmtA +rmtE+ rmtF, rmtG and rmtH, respectively. We would like to thank staff from the AMRHAI Reference Unit at PHE for their assistance with strain characterization. Finally, we would like to thank the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute for carrying out Illumina sequencing on the bacterial isolates. The research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance at Imperial College London in partnership with Public Health England. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health or Public Health England. Part of this work was previously presented at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Vienna, Austria (session number OS0298).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Crown Copyright

Keywords

  • 16S RMTase
  • aminoglycoside resistance
  • bla
  • genetic environment

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Novel 16S rRNA methyltransferase RmtE3 in Acinetobacter baumannii ST79'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this