New Estimates of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Seroprevalence in England: 'High' but Stable Seroprevalence over the Last Decade

Marianne Morris-Cunnington*, David Brown, Jeanne Pimenta, Noah Jamie Robinson, Elizbeth Miller

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: There have been few recent population-based herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) seroprevalence studies in England, but reports from the United States have indicated a 30% rise in HSV-2 seroprevalence between 1976 and 1994. This study aimed to ascertain trends in HSV-2 infection in England between 1991 and 2000. Study Design: Anonymized serum residues collected through public health laboratories across England from individuals aged 16 to 64 years seeking health care through the National Health Service in 1991 (n = 2259) and 2000 (n = 3646) were tested for anti-HSV-2 IgG using the HerpeSelect 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay IgG (Focus). Results: In 9 sites across England, the age- and sex-standardized HSV-2 seroprevalence was 9.7% (95% confidence interval, 8.4-11.0%). Data from 4 sites common to both study years indicated no change in HSV-2 seroprevalence between 1991 and 2000. Conclusions: After adjustment for age, sex, and geographic location, there was no evidence of a change in seroprevalence between 1991 and 2000.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)243-246
    Number of pages4
    JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
    Volume31
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

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