Mosquito Magnet® traps as a potential means of monitoring blackflies of medical and veterinary importance

D. López-Peña, F. M. Hawkes, G. I. Gibson, C. Johnston, A. G.C. Vaux, Lis-Cantín, J. M. Medlock, R. A. Cheke*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Mosquito Magnet® traps, deployed in widespread parts of England as part of nationwide mosquito surveillance projects, also caught blackflies. As many as 1242 blackflies were caught in a trapping session lasting 4 days. Principal among the species caught were Simulium equinum, Simulium lineatum and Simulium ornatum s.l. As S. ornatum s.l. is a vector that transmits Onchocerca linealis to cattle and S. equinum is responsible for dermatitis (‘sweet itch’) in cattle and horses, it is suggested that Mosquito Magnet® traps could be used to monitor and partially control these pests, as well as nuisance anthropophilic blackflies such as Simulium posticatum that can cause simuliidosis in southern England.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)646-651
Number of pages6
JournalMedical and Veterinary Entomology
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding for the field work in 2013 was provided by the U.K. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) grants SV3040, SE4215 and SE4112. The WetlandLIFE Project ( www.wetlandlife.org ) was supported by the Valuing Nature programme of the UK Natural Environment Research Council grant number NE/N013379/1. A variety of projects supported the Public Health England's mosquito surveillance programme and the views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Department of Health or Public Health England. David López‐Peña thanks the Ministeri d'Innovació, Universitats, Ciència i Societat Digital, Direcció General de Ciència i Recerca, Servei de Gestió de Programes d'R+D+I de Valencia, Spain, for a European Union‐sponsored post‐doctoral grant (reference number BEST/2020/212) to visit the U.K. We thank Elaine Cameron of Woodstream Europe Ltd. for providing a Mosquito Magnet® trap to the WetlandLIFE project, Simon Springate and Harrison Lambert for field assistance and the various landowners who gave permission for traps to be run on their properties. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Funding Information:
Funding for the field work in 2013 was provided by the U.K. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) grants SV3040, SE4215 and SE4112. The WetlandLIFE Project (www.wetlandlife.org) was supported by the Valuing Nature programme of the UK Natural Environment Research Council grant number NE/N013379/1. A variety of projects supported the Public Health England's mosquito surveillance programme and the views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Department of Health or Public Health England. David L?pez-Pe?a thanks the Ministeri d'Innovaci?, Universitats, Ci?ncia i Societat Digital, Direcci? General de Ci?ncia i Recerca, Servei de Gesti? de Programes d'R+D+I de Valencia, Spain, for a European Union-sponsored post-doctoral grant (reference number BEST/2020/212) to visit the U.K. We thank Elaine Cameron of Woodstream Europe Ltd. for providing a Mosquito Magnet? trap to the WetlandLIFE project, Simon Springate and Harrison Lambert for field assistance and the various landowners who gave permission for traps to be run on their properties. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Medical and Veterinary Entomology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Royal Entomological Society.

Keywords

  • Haematophagous blackflies
  • Simulium equinum
  • Simulium lineatum
  • Simulium ornatum
  • sweet itch
  • traps

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mosquito Magnet® traps as a potential means of monitoring blackflies of medical and veterinary importance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this