Long-term reliability in reporting of childhood pets by adults interviewed twice, 9 years apart. Results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey i and II

C. Svanes*, S. Dharmage, J. Sunyer, J. P. Zock, D. Norbäck, M. Wjst, J. Heinrich, D. Jarvis, R. De Marco, E. Plana, S. Villani, J. M. Antó

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Investigation of long-term effects of childhood pet exposure is usually based on retrospective information provided by adults, while there is little knowledge about the reliability in adult reporting of childhood events. We analyzed 8287 adults interviewed about childhood pets twice, on average nine years apart, in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Agreement between the surveys in reporting of childhood cats, dogs and birds were investigated with kappa statistics, and potential effects of disease status on agreement were analyzed with kappa statistics and multiple logistic regressions. Cats, dogs and birds in childhood were reported by 44, 41 and 38%, respectively. Cohen's kappa for agreement in adult reporting of childhood pets was 0.714 (95% CI=0.698-0.729) for cat, 0.709 (0.691-0.722) for dog, and 0.606 (0.591-0.626) for bird. Thus, agreement was significantly higher for reporting of cat and dog than for bird. Adult wheeze, asthma or atopy did not influence agreement. Neither did adult cat sensitization influence agreement in adult reporting of childhood cat. Childhood factors such as moving house <5 years, or growing up as a single child, in a large family or in a rural area, were associated with poorer agreement, while adult factors were unrelated to agreement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-92
Number of pages9
JournalIndoor Air
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Asthma
  • ECRHS
  • Pets
  • Reliability
  • Repeatability

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term reliability in reporting of childhood pets by adults interviewed twice, 9 years apart. Results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey i and II'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this