Invasive meningococcal disease: Completeness and timeliness of reporting of confirmed cases in Thames Valley, 2006-2007

Karthikeyan Paranthaman*, L. Kent, N. McCarthy, S. J. Gray

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: Regular evaluation of disease surveillance systems is essential. This study assessed the completeness and timeliness of reporting of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Thames Valley in 2006-2007. Study design: Retrospective review of two data sources used in disease surveillance: the list of notified cases to the Thames Valley Health Protection Unit (TVHPU) and the list of confirmed cases at the reference laboratory during 2006-2007. Methods: The datasets were compared by checking patient name, date of birth, sample date and date of onset of illness. Completeness was estimated using Tilling's capture-recapture method. Timeliness was assessed by calculating the difference between the date of admission and the date of notification to the TVHPU. Results: The estimated completeness of reporting of IMD cases was calculated as 90.5% (95% confidence interval 88.6-92.4). Thirty-six percent of cases were notified on the day of admission, 63% were notified within 1 day and 72% were notified within 2 days (range 0-36 days). Conclusions: Timeliness and completeness of reporting of IMD was clearly suboptimal. It is critical to educate clinicians on the need to notify all suspected cases of IMD to public health authorities in a timely manner.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)805-808
    Number of pages4
    JournalPublic Health
    Volume123
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

    Keywords

    • Disease notification
    • Meningococcal infections
    • Population surveillance
    • Retrospective studies
    • Time factors

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