International cooperation to improve access to and sustain effectiveness of antimicrobials

Christine Årdal, Kevin Outterson, Steven J. Hoffman, Abdul Ghafur, Mike Sharland, Nisha Ranganathan, Richard Smith, Anna Zorzet, Jennifer Cohn, Didier Pittet, Nils Daulaire, Chantal Morel, Zain Rizvi, Manica Balasegaram, Osman A. Dar, David L. Heymann, Alison H. Holmes, Luke S.P. Moore, Ramanan Laxminarayan, Marc MendelsonJohn Arne Røttingen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Securing access to effective antimicrobials is one of the greatest challenges today. Until now, efforts to address this issue have been isolated and uncoordinated, with little focus on sustainable and international solutions. Global collective action is necessary to improve access to life-saving antimicrobials, conserving them, and ensuring continued innovation. Access, conservation, and innovation are beneficial when achieved independently, but much more effective and sustainable if implemented in concert within and across countries. WHO alone will not be able to drive these actions. It will require a multisector response (including the health, agriculture, and veterinary sectors), global coordination, and financing mechanisms with sufficient mandates, authority, resources, and power. Fortunately, securing access to effective antimicrobials has finally gained a place on the global political agenda, and we call on policy makers to develop, endorse, and finance new global institutional arrangements that can ensure robust implementation and bold collective action.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-307
Number of pages12
JournalThe Lancet
Volume387
Issue number10015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jan 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
There was no funding to write this manuscript. However, travel and accommodation to attend author meetings were paid jointly by the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. SJH is financially supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Research Council of Norway, and the Trudeau Foundation. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not reflect the views of any of the authors' institutions.

Funding Information:
Several national initiatives are of a magnitude to have a global effect, even though their geographical scope is restricted. An announcement in June, 2014, stated that the £10 million Longitude Prize would focus on point-of-care diagnostics, with the creation of a “cost-effective, accurate, rapid and easy-to-use test for bacterial infections”. 26 A similar diagnostic prize proposal was announced by the US Government in September, 2014. 27 Some countries have also created partnerships with individual pharmaceutical companies; one such example is the 3·5-year collaboration between AstraZeneca and Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research to develop new drugs against Gram-negative bacterial infections. 28 The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) in the USA has partnered with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to develop new antibiotics with a potential of US$200 million for GSK if milestones are met. 29 Total funding from the US National Institutes of Health for antibacterial resistance averaged US$90 million per year in 2013 and 2014.

Funding Information:
There was no funding to write this manuscript. However, travel and accommodation to attend author meetings were paid jointly by the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. SJH is fi nancially supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Research Council of Norway, and the Trudeau Foundation. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not refl ect the views of any of the authors'' institutions.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

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