Induction of high levels of protective immunity in mice after vaccination using dendritic cells infected with auxotrophic mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Eleanor Roy, A. Dharshan De Silva, Vasan K. Sambandamurthy, Simon Clark, Evangelos Stavropoulos, William R. Jacobs, John Brennan, John Chan, Ann Williams, M. Joseph Colston, Ricardo E. Tascon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adoptively transferred dendritic cells presenting antigens derived from different pathogens have been shown to elicit specific T cell responses and to induce protective antibacterial immunity. We describe here the induction of high levels of protective immunity in mice using dendritic cells infected with auxotrophic mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We provide evidence that protection is superior to BCG and that it is associated with increased priming of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for mycobacterial antigens. This method for generating high levels of anti-bacterial protective immunity could be helpful in the design of novel vaccines against tuberculosis and other intracellular pathogens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-199
Number of pages4
JournalImmunology Letters
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank The Medical Research Council for Support and for funding Eleanor Roy. Work done at AECOM was supported by NIH grants AI 26170 and HL 71241. We also thank Dr. Joe Locker for assistance with the histopathological work, Dr. Brigitta Stockinger for advice and for providing us with the immortalised tsDC cell line used in the guinea pigs studies and to B. Chen for his technical assistance.

Keywords

  • Auxothrophic
  • Dendritic
  • Protective
  • Tuberculosis
  • Vaccine

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