High frequency of simple and complex chromosome aberrations detected in the Tokai-mura survivor four and five years after the 1999 criticality accident

Natalia Sumption, Liz Ainsbury, Dudley Goodhead, Toshiyuki Hirama, Makoto Akashi, Manami Monobe, Koichi Ando, Rhona Anderson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In September 1999 a criticality accident occurred in a uranium processing plant in Tokai-mura, Japan. During the accident, three workers (A, B and C) were exposed to high acute doses of neutrons and γ-rays: workers A and B fatally and worker C to an estimated whole body absorbed dose of 0. 81 Gy neutrons and 1. 3 Gy γ-rays. We obtained fixed peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) preparations from worker C approximately four and five years after the accident and assayed by 24 colour karyotyping (M-FISH) to determine the frequency and complexity of chromosome aberrations present. We observed a high frequency of simple reciprocal translocations, which we used to provide a rough estimation of dose and, in addition, for the assessment of the emergence of any clinically-relevant clonal exchanges. We did not observe any evidence of clonality but did find some evidence suggesting chromosome 1 as being preferentially involved in exchanges in stable cells. We also detected a relatively high frequency of damaged cells containing complex chromosome aberrations, of both the stable and unstable types. Qualitatively these complex aberrations were consistent with those observed to be induced after exposure to low doses of high-LET radiation or moderate doses of low-LET radiation, supporting the suggestion that heavily damaged cells can be quite long-lived in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-308
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Radiation Research
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • 24-colour karyotyping
  • Complex aberrations
  • Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

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