Hazara virus infection is lethal for adult type I interferon receptor-knockout mice and may act as a surrogate for infection with the human-pathogenic Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus

Stuart Dowall, Stephen Findlay-Wilson, Emma Rayner, Geoff Pearson, Janice Pickersgill, Antony Rule, Natasha Merredew, Hazel Smith, John Chamberlain, Roger Hewson

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    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hazara virus (HAZV) is closely related to the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). HAZV has not been reported to cause human disease; work with infectious material can be carried out at containment level (CL)-2. By contrast, CCHFV causes a haemorrhagic fever in humans and requires CL-4 facilities. A disease model of HAZV infection in mice deficient in the type I interferon receptor is reported in this study. Dose-response effects were seen with higher doses, resulting in a shorter time to death and earlier detection of viral loads in organs. The lowest dose of 10 p.f.u. was still lethal in over 50% of the mice. Histopathological findings were identified in the liver, spleen and lymph nodes, with changes similar to a recent mouse model of CCHFV infection. The findings demonstrate that inoculation of mice with HAZV may act as a useful surrogate model for the testing of antiviral agents against CCHFV.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)560-564
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of General Virology
    Volume93
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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