First report of human exposure to Hyalomma marginatum in England: Further evidence of a Hyalomma moulting event in north-western Europe?

L. McGinley*, Kayleigh Hansford, Benjamin Cull, E. L. Gillingham, D. P. Carter, J. F. Chamberlain, L. M. Hernandez-Triana, L. P. Phipps, Jolyon Medlock

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyalomma marginatum is widely distributed across the Mediterranean, Northern Africa and the Middle East. Current climate conditions in Northern Europe are thought to limit the species’ ability to moult to the adult stage. It is a vector of several pathogens of human and veterinary concern, including Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, for which it is the primary vector in Europe. Here, we report the first human exposure to a locally acquired adult H. marginatum in England, and the second detection in England of Rickettsia aeschlimannii associated with imported Hyalomma.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101541
Number of pages4
JournalTicks and Tick-borne Diseases
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
JMM is partly funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Environmental Change and Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) , and in collaboration with the University of Exeter , University College London , and the Met Office . The authors thank the PHE Virology Department for carrying out pathogen testing and the Genomic Services Development Unit for performing sequencing. We thank the EU Framework Horizon 2020 Innovation Grant (EVAg, No. 653316), and the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) , Scottish Government and Welsh Government through grants SV3045 and SE4113 for funding. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health or PHE.

Funding Information:
The authors thank Neil Lawton (Warden at Scolt Head Island NNR) and Gary Hibberd (Warden at Holme NNR) who detected the tick, and Steve Lane for recognising the specimen as Hyalomma species, noting its significance and submitting it to the TSS. JMM is partly funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Environmental Change and Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in partnership with Public Health England (PHE), and in collaboration with the University of Exeter, University College London, and the Met Office. The authors thank the PHE Virology Department for carrying out pathogen testing and the Genomic Services Development Unit for performing sequencing. We thank the EU Framework Horizon 2020 Innovation Grant (EVAg, No. 653316), and the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), Scottish Government and Welsh Government through grants SV3045 and SE4113 for funding. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health or PHE.

Funding Information:
JMM is partly funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Environmental Change and Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in partnership with Public Health England (PHE), and in collaboration with the University of Exeter, University College London, and the Met Office. The authors thank the PHE Virology Department for carrying out pathogen testing and the Genomic Services Development Unit for performing sequencing. We thank the EU Framework Horizon 2020 Innovation Grant (EVAg, No. 653316), and the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), Scottish Government and Welsh Government through grants SV3045 and SE4113 for funding. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health or PHE.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Hyalomma
  • Importation
  • Public health
  • Rickettsia aeschlimannii
  • COMPLEX
  • VIRUS
  • RICKETTSIA-AESCHLIMANNII
  • MOLECULAR-DETECTION
  • TICKS
  • CONGO HEMORRHAGIC-FEVER
  • BIRDS
  • VECTOR

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