Differences in nasal immunoglobulin A responses to influenza vaccine strains after live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) immunization in children

P. J. Turner, A. F. Abdulla, M. E. Cole, R. R. Javan, V. Gould, M. E. O'Driscoll, Joanna Southern, Maria Zambon, E. Miller, Nicholas Andrews, Katja Hoschler, J. S. Tregoning*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Different vaccine strains included in the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) have variable efficacy. The reasons for this are not clear and may include differences in immunogenicity. We report a Phase IV open-label study on the immunogenicity of a single dose of quadrivalent LAIV (Fluenz™ Tetra) in children during the 2015/16 season, to investigate the antibody responses to different strains. Eligible children were enrolled to receive LAIV; nasal samples were collected before and approximately 4 weeks after immunization. There was a significant increase in nasal immunoglobulin (Ig)A to the H3N2, B/Victoria lineage (B/Brisbane) and B/Yamagata lineage (B/Phuket) components, but not to the H1N1 component. The fold change in nasal IgA response was inversely proportional to the baseline nasal IgA titre for H1N1, H3N2 and B/Brisbane. We investigated possible associations that may explain baseline nasal IgA, including age and prior vaccination status, but found different patterns for different antigens, suggesting that the response is multi-factorial. Overall, we observed differences in immune responses to different viral strains included in the vaccine; the reasons for this require further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-118
Number of pages10
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
Volume199
Issue number2
Early online date31 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: We thank Professor Steven Riley for assistance with the data analysis approach. This paper is independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) and the NIHR Policy Research Programme (Vaccine Evaluation Consortium Phase II, 039/0031: grant holder E. M.). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. P. J. T. was supported by a Clinician Scientist award funded by the UK Medical Research Council (reference MR/K010468/1).

National Institute for Health Research
National Vaccine Evaluation Consortium. Grant Number: Awarded to Liz Miller
UK Medical Research Council. Grant Number: MR/K010468/1

Open Access: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Publisher Copyright: © 2019 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

Citation: Turner, P.J., Abdulla, A.F., Cole, M.E., Javan, R.R., Gould, V., O'Driscoll, M.E., Southern, J., Zambon, M., Miller, E., Andrews, N.J., Höschler, K. and Tregoning, J.S. (2020), Differences in nasal immunoglobulin A responses to influenza vaccine strains after live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) immunization in children. Clin Exp Immunol, 199: 109-118.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/cei.13395

Keywords

  • children
  • influenza
  • nasal
  • public health
  • vaccine

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