Development of an educational package for the universal human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme: a co-production study with young people and key informants

Harriet Fisher*, Tracey Chantler, Adam Finn, Joanna Kesten, Matthew Hickman, Louise Letley, Sandra Mounier-Jack, Clare Thomas, Katie Worthington, Julie Yates, Suzanne Audrey

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Background: The English schools-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme is routinely offered to all young people aged 12–13 years, to prevent cancers affecting the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus and mouth. Lower uptake among some population groups has been identified, in part, because of unmet information needs among young people. To address these unmet needs we report intervention planning and development processes to co-produce an educational package about the HPV vaccine. 

Methods: We used co-production research methodologies and the ‘person-based approach’ involving the following iterative stages: (i) collating and analysing primary and secondary evidence, including HPV vaccine communication materials, interviews and workshops; (ii) developing guiding principles; (iii) undertaking a behavioural analysis informed by the Behaviour Change Wheel and the Behaviour Change Technique taxonomy; (iv) development of a preliminary logic model; (v) co-production of resources, and; (vi) refinement of resources informed by feedback from young people and key informants. 

Results: We co-produced EDUCATE, a theory-based educational package, that is designed to be delivered to young people prior to being offered the HPV vaccine to support uptake. Young people and key informants identified the following key issues to include as content: (i) HPV-related information; (ii) how vaccines work; (iii) safety and side-effects of the HPV vaccine; (iii) eligibility for the HPV vaccination programme, and; (iv) preparation of young people to receive the HPV vaccine. A manual for professionals (e.g. immunisation nurses, school staff) delivering the intervention and a PowerPoint presentation, interspersed with five short films, were co-produced with young people and key informants. Following feedback, the content of the EDUCATE package was refined to increase acceptability, engagement, and persuasiveness to the target users. 

Conclusion: Engagement with young people and key informants was integral to the development of our rigorously developed, theory-based intervention to address young people’s information needs about the HPV vaccination programme. The acceptability and persuasiveness of the package has been maximised by working closely with young people and key informants to develop the content. An implementation study to examine how the EDUCATE package is implemented in practice and the impact on uptake of the HPV vaccination programme is underway.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16
JournalResearch Involvement and Engagement
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This work is supported by the Medical Research Council (MRC) Public Health Intervention Development scheme (Project Number: MR/T027150/1) .

HF and SA acknowledge support from the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Behavioural Science and Evaluation at University of Bristol. The Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in Behavioural Science and Evaluation at University of Bristol is part of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and a partnership between University of Bristol and UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), in collaboration with the MRC Biostatistics Unit at University of Cambridge and University of the West of England. This study is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Vaccines and Immunisation (NIHR200929), a partnership between UK Health Security Agency and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR, UK Health Security Agency or the Department of Health and Social Care. JK and CT are partly funded by National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration West (NIHR ARC West) and NIHR HPRU BSE.

Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

Publisher Copyright: © The Author(s) 2022.

Citation: Fisher, H., Chantler, T., Finn, A. et al. Development of an educational package for the universal human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme: a co-production study with young people and key informants. Res Involv Engagem 8, 16 (2022).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40900-022-00349-7

Keywords

  • Co-production
  • HPV vaccine
  • Intervention development
  • Patient and public involvement
  • Person-based approach
  • Young people

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