COVID-19 vaccination acceptability in the UK at the start of the vaccination programme: a nationally representative cross-sectional survey (CoVAccS – wave 2)

S. M. Sherman*, J. Sim, M. Cutts, H. Dasch, R. Amlôt, G. J. Rubin, N. Sevdalis, L. E. Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Investigate factors associated with the intention to have the COVID-19 vaccination following initiation of the UK national vaccination programme. 

Study design: An online cross-sectional survey completed by 1500 adults (13th–15th January 2021). 

Methods: Linear regression analyses were used to investigate associations between intention to be vaccinated for COVID-19 and sociodemographic factors, previous influenza vaccination, attitudes and beliefs about COVID-19 and COVID-19 vaccination and vaccination in general. Participants’ main reasons for likely vaccination (non-)uptake were also solicited. Results: 73.5% of participants (95% CI 71.2%, 75.7%) reported being likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19, 17.3% (95% CI 15.4%, 19.3%) were unsure, and 9.3% (95% CI 7.9%, 10.8%) reported being unlikely to be vaccinated. The full regression model explained 69.8% of the variance in intention. Intention was associated with: having been/intending to be vaccinated for influenza last winter/this winter; stronger beliefs about social acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine; the perceived need for vaccination; adequacy of information about the vaccine; and weaker beliefs that the vaccine is unsafe. Beliefs that only those at serious risk of illness should be vaccinated and that the vaccines are just a means for manufacturers to make money were negatively associated with vaccination intention. 

Conclusions: Most participants reported being likely to get the COVID-19 vaccination. COVID-19 vaccination attitudes and beliefs are a crucial factor underpinning vaccine intention. Continued engagement with the public with a focus on the importance and safety of vaccination is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health
Volume202
Early online date18 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: The authors disclose receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: a Keele University Faculty of Natural Sciences Research Development award to SS, JS and NS, and a Kings COVID Appeal Fund award granted jointly to LS, GJR, RA, NS, SS and JS. LS, RA and GJR are supported by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Emergency Preparedness and Response, a partnership between Public Health England , King's College London and the University of East Anglia . NS′ research is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration ( ARC ) South London at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. NS is a member of King's Improvement Science, which offers co-funding to the NIHR ARC South London and is funded by King's Health Partners ( Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust , King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust , King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust ), and the Guy's and St Thomas’ Charity. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, the charities, Public Health England or the Department of Health and Social Care.

Open Access: Free to read, but no Open Access licence.

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Citation: S.M. Sherman, J. Sim, M. Cutts, H. Dasch, R. Amlôt, G.J. Rubin, N. Sevdalis, L.E. Smith, COVID-19 vaccination acceptability in the UK at the start of the vaccination programme: a nationally representative cross-sectional survey (CoVAccS – wave 2), Public Health, Volume 202, 2022, Pages 1-9, ISSN 0033-3506.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2021.10.008.

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Barriers
  • Beliefs
  • Covid-19 vaccines
  • Hesitancy
  • Side effects

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