Correlation between hepatitis B genotypes, 1896 precore mutation, virus loads and liver dysfunction in an Indian population

Perumal Vivekanandan, Sara Bissett, Samreen Ijaz, Gee Teo Chong, Gopalan Sridharan, Sukanya Raghuraman, Hubert Darius Daniel, Manohar L. Kavitha, Dolly Daniel, George M. Chandy, Priya Abraham*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background/objectives: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes may differ in pathogenicity. However, the interplay between different virus characteristics such as genotypes, mutants and virus loads has not been well studied. We investigated the association between HBV genotype, presence of 1896 precore mutation and HBV viral loads in patients with HBV-related liver disease. Methods: One hundred and sixteen HBV DNA-seropositive patients attending a gastroenterology outpatient clinic and 107 HBV DNA-seropositive blood donors were recruited. The subjects were stratified as those with normal (Group I, n=164) and elevated (Group II, n=59) ALT levels. The HBV genotype and the presence of the 1896 precore mutation were determined, and plasma HBV DNA levels measured. Results: Genotype C was more common in Group II than in Group I (10 (17%) vs. 4 (2.4%); p<0.005). There was no relationship between the 1896 precore mutation and the HBV DNA levels. Subjects with genotype C (n=14) had higher HBV DNA levels than those with genotypes A (n=33) or D (n=158). Conclusions: The infecting genotype, but not the presence of 1896 precore mutation, correlates with HBV load. The association of genotype C with higher virus loads and with elevated ALT may point to a greater pathogenicity of this genotype.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)142-147
    Number of pages6
    JournalIndian Journal of Gastroenterology
    Volume27
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008

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