Comprehensive clinical and laboratory follow-up of a female patient with Ebola virus disease: Sierra Leone Ebola virus persistence study

Sierra Leone Ebola Virus Persistence Study Group

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The clinical, virologic, and immunologic findings in a female Ebola virus disease patient are described. During the long-term follow-up, Ebola virus RNA was detectable in vaginal fluid before 36 days after symptom onset, with nearly an identical genome sequence as in acute phase blood. Ebola-specific T cells retained activation at 56 days after disease onset.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberofz068
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
work was supported by the World Health Organization, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, including the Major Special Projects for Infectious Disease Research of China (grant 2016ZX10004222-003). The WHO acknowledges the financial contribution of the WHO Ebola Response Program, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP)- United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)-UNICEF-WHO-World Bank Special Program of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), a cosponsored program executed by the WHO in support of the Sierra Leone Ebola Virus Persistence Study.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence

Keywords

  • Clinical sequelae
  • Ebola virus
  • Immune responses
  • Virus genome
  • Virus persistence

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