Comparison of the effect of detergent versus hypochlorite cleaning on environmental contamination and incidence of Clostridium difficile infection

Mark H. Wilcox*, W. N. Fawley, N. Wigglesworth, P. Parnell, P. Verity, J. Freeman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

217 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine how best to decontaminate the hospital environment of Clostridium difficile, we carried out a cross-over study on two elderly medicine wards to determine whether cleaning with a hypochlorite disinfectant was better than using neutral detergent in reducing the incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI). We examined 1128 environmental samples in two years, 35% of which grew C. difficile. There was a significant decrease of CDI incidence on ward X, from 8.9 to 5.3 cases per 100 admissions (P <0.05) using hypochlorite, but there was no significant effect on ward Y. On ward X the incidence of CDI was significantly associated with the proportion of culture-positive environmental sites (P <0.05). On ward Y the only significant correlation between CDI and C. difficile culture-positive environmental sites was in patient side-rooms (r =0.41, P <0.05). The total daily defined doses of cefotaxime, cephradine and aminopenicillins were similar throughout the trial. These results provide some evidence that use of hypochlorite for environmental cleaning may significantly reduce incidence of CDI, but emphasize the potential for confounding factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-114
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cleaning agents
  • Clostridium difficile
  • Environmental contamination
  • Hypochloryte

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of the effect of detergent versus hypochlorite cleaning on environmental contamination and incidence of Clostridium difficile infection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this