Clustering of human t lymphotropic virus type i seropositivity in montserrat, west indies: Evidence for an environmental factor in transmission of the virus

G. J. Miller*, L. L. Lewis, S. M. Colman, J. A. Cooper, Graham Lloyd, N. Scollen, N. Jones, R. S. Tedder, M. F. Greaves

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A community survey of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) in Montserrat, West Indies, identified 22 instances in which 2 HTLV-I-seropositive adults lived within 60 m of each other (close pairs), compared with 7.8 expected (P <.001). Five of these close pairs were mother-offspring or husband-wife. The remaining 17 pairs were of unrelated members in separate households. The percentages of male-female (41%), female-female (41 %), and male-male (18%) types in these 17 pairs were very similar to those among the 1377 similarly defined pairs in which neither or only 1 member was seropositive, affording no support for extramarital heterosexual activity as an explanation for the clustering observed. Thus, the demography of HTLV-I was not accounted for completely by sexual and mother-to-offspring transmission. The predominance of clustering of unrelated HTLV-I-seropositive individuals in locations with high mosquito infestation raised the possibility of sporadic transmission of HTLV-I by hematophagous insects.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)44-50
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume170
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 1994

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