Biosafety and biosecurity requirements for Orientia spp. diagnosis and research: Recommendations for risk-based biocontainment, work practices and the case for reclassification to risk group 2

Stuart D. Blacksell*, Matthew T. Robinson, Paul N. Newton, Soiratchaneekorn Ruanchaimun, Jeanne Salje, Tri Wangrangsimakul, Matthew D. Wegner, Mohammad Yazid Abdad, Allan Bennett, Allen L. Richards, John Stenos, Nicholas P.J. Day

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Scrub typhus is an important arthropod-borne disease causing significant acute febrile illness by infection with Orientia spp. Using a risk-based approach, this review examines current practice, the evidence base and regulatory requirements regarding matters of biosafety and biosecurity, and presents the case for reclassification from Risk Group 3 to Risk Group 2 along with recommendations for safe working practices of risk-based activities during the manipulation of Orientia spp. in the laboratory. We recommend to reclassify Orientia spp. to Risk Group 2 based on the classification for RG2 pathogens as being moderate individual risk, low community risk. We recommend that low risk activities, can be performed within a biological safety cabinet located in a Biosafety Level (BSL) 2 core laboratory using standard personal protective equipment. But when the risk assessment indicates, such as high concentration and volume, or aerosol generation, then a higher biocontainment level is warranted. For, the majority of animal activities involving Orientia spp., Animal BSL 2 (ABSL2) is recommended however where high risk activities are performed including necropsies, Animal BSL (ABSL3) is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1044
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
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Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Biocontainment
  • Biosafety
  • Orientia
  • Risk group
  • Scrub typhus

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