Being assigned a clinical nurse specialist is associated with better experiences of cancer care: English population-based study using the linked National Cancer Patient Experience Survey and Cancer Registration Dataset

Saleh A. Alessy*, Margreet Luchtenborg, Janette Rawlinson, Matthew Baker, Elizabeth A. Davies

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to examine whether being given the name of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is associated with better cancer patients' experiences across different points along their cancer care pathway.

Methods: We identified 100,885 colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancer patients who responded to the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey between 2010 and 2014. We compared experiences of four key aspects of cancer care among patients who reported being given a CNS name with those who did not, adjusting for age, sex, socio-economic deprivation, ethnicity, route to diagnosis and disease stage.

Results: Across all cancers, patients who reported being given the name of a CNS reported better experiences with involvement in treatment decisions, care coordination, treatment with more respect and dignity, and overall care experience. Experience of being involved in treatment decisions was the aspect of care most strongly associated with being given a CNS name (colorectal: OR 2.69, 95% CI: 2.45–2.96; lung: OR 2.41, 95% CI: 2.07–2.78; breast: OR 2.68, 95% CI: 2.47–2.92; and prostate: OR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.92–2.32).

Conclusion: These findings may provide new evidence of the vital contribution CNS make to cancer care and suggest their input and support should be available to all patients after the diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Early online date26 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Jul 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not‐for‐profit sectors. This work is part of Saleh Alessy's PhD project, which is fully sponsored by Ministry of Education, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Open Access: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Citation: Alessy, S. A., Lüchtenborg, M., Rawlinson, J., Baker, M., & Davies, E. A. (2021). Being assigned a clinical nurse specialist is associated with better experiences of cancer care: English population-based study using the linked National Cancer Patient Experience Survey and Cancer Registration Dataset. European Journal of Cancer Care, 1– 11.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13490

Keywords

  • cancer
  • clinical nurse specialist
  • patient experience
  • survey
  • DIAGNOSIS
  • ENGLAND

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