Associations and effect modification between transportation noise, self-reported response to noise and the wider determinants of health: A narrative synthesis of the literature

Eulalia Peris, Benjamin Fenech*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Noise and health guidance to date have focused on the direct links between noise and health outcomes such as annoyance, sleep disturbance, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, and cognitive impairment in schoolchildren. However, noise is a psychosocial stressor, and there are individual studies showing that exposure to noise or the self-reported responses to noise may affect health through interactions with the wider determinants of health and well-being including physical activity, use of green spaces and social interactions. Despite this emerging evidence concerning potential impacts of noise on the wider determinants of health, literature in the field remains dispersed and unsynthesised. This study seeks to synthetize evidence on different relationships between transportation noise, self-reported responses to noise and the wider determinants of health using a systematic review methodology. The search was conducted in Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus on articles published from 2000 to 2017. This led to the review of 76 papers which satisfied the inclusion criteria. Despite strong heterogeneity in the studies' methodologies and indicators used, there is some evidence that noise exposure and responses to noise such as annoyance and disturbance are associated with people's lifestyle, recreational activities as well as the local economy of the neighbourhood. On the other hand, there are some wider determinants of health, mainly those related to the built and natural environment, which modify the relationship between noise exposure and self-reported responses to noise. In particular, greenness, having access to quiet areas, and covering noise sources either visually or acoustically with natural features seems to decrease people's negative responses to noise. Results indicate that transportation noise has the potential to affect health through various pathways, and a holistic approach is needed to capture all the effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number141040
JournalScience of the Total Environment, The
Volume748
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Noise annoyance
  • Noise-health interactions
  • Transportation noise
  • Wider determinants of health

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