Are there intergenerational differences in the diets of young children born to first- and second-generation Pakistani Muslims in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK?

Suzanne Parsons*, Jennifer Godson, S. A. Williams, J. E. Cade

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In previous reports, the diets of second- compared with first-generation adults have shown greater signs of acculturation. This study aimed to assess whether this was also true amongst 3-year-old UK-born children of first- (1G) (n = 117) and second-generation (2G) (n = 109) Pakistani mothers in Bradford. Materials and methods: A random sample of mothers was selected (n = 320), with generation groups matched for month of birth, sex of child and district of residence. Home-based interviews were undertaken by multilingual female interviewers. Mother's social characteristics and infant feeding practices were examined and a 24-h dietary recall for the child was collected. Child's position in the family was not considered in this analysis. Results: Interviews were completed for 226 mothers (117, 1G and 109, 2G). The groups varied according to educational background, linguistic ability and employment status, but analysis of dietary recall indicated more similarities between the groups than differences. For example, traditional foods were limited to midday or evening meals, snacks usually consisted of crisps and biscuits, and sweetened milk or tea was consumed at breakfast. Some differences did exist: water was more likely to be consumed by children of 1G mothers at the midday and evening meals; fish and chips were a more frequent food item among those of 2G mothers. Conclusion: Evidence of dietary transition between groups was minimal using this methodology. This may be due to the cohesive nature of the Pakistani community resulting in it evolving in unison, or because all young children may be subject to similar dietary and cultural expectations and pressures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-122
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Infants
  • Migrants

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