A recipe for disaster: Outbreaks of campylobacteriosis associated with poultry liver pâté in England and Wales

Christine Little, F. J. Gormley, N. Rawal, J. F. Richardson

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    67 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite the frequency of Campylobacter as the principal cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the UK, outbreaks attributed to this pathogen are rare. One hundred and fourteen general foodborne outbreaks of campylobacteriosis were reported to the Health Protection Agency from 1992 to 2009 with most occurring in food service establishments (64%, 73/114). Poultry meat (38%, 43/114) was the most commonly reported vehicle of infection, of which poultry liver pâté, and undercooking, were strongly associated with this pathogen. Notably, the number of outbreaks of campylobacteriosis linked to consumption of poultry liver pâté in England and Wales increased significantly from 2007 (74% as opposed to 12%, P<000001) with a preponderance of these occurring in December. These outbreaks highlight the hazards associated with inappropriate culinary practices leading to undercooking of poultry liver pâté and suggest that improving catering practice is an important last line of defence in reducing exposure to Campylobacter-contaminated products.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1691-1694
    Number of pages4
    JournalEpidemiology and Infection
    Volume138
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

    Keywords

    • Campylobacter
    • Chicken
    • Foodborne outbreak
    • Liver
    • Pâté

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