A quantitative descriptive study of the prevalence of carriage (colonisation) of haemolytic streptococci groups A, B, C and G in pregnancy

I. A. Hassan, T. S. Onon, D. Weston, B. Isalska, K. Wall, B. Afshar, A. Efstratiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive group B streptococcus (GBS) disease is a leading cause of neonatal death. There is no UK national screening programme for GBS in pregnancy, hence colonisation rates are unknown. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis is given during labour to colonised women to reduce neonatal GBS transmission and subsequent invasive infection. Data about prevalence of other haemolytic streptococci in pregnancy, including group A streptococcus (GAS), are uncommon despite increasing importance. This study investigated colonisation in 100 pregnant women using conventional culture methods; 19% had GBS. This suggests that GBS carriage is common in the UK. The role of other β-haemolytic streptococci remains undefined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-209
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Invasive group B streptococcus
  • national screening programme for GBS
  • neonatal death

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